Virtual Reality for Sitting Down 

 

VR is going to change the world.  Like the internet, it will seem slow while it’s happening, but insanely fast when we look back 20 years.  

The first time I put on a VR headset, the feeling of being transported to another dimension was awe inspiring.  I was standing on the deck of a sunken ship, the subdued bluish hue of the sea life swimming around seemed remarkably realistic.  The finale was the blue whale, who swims up closely and looks you in the eye.  Mesmerizing.  My husband was telling me to look around, but it felt rude to look away from that eye holding me captive.  It felt real.

 

 

 

 

That is the beauty of VR, the puzzling ability of your mind to accept even cartoon worlds as real.  The adaptive ability of the brain to make the controls in your hands feel like they really are paddles, or swords, or rackets

This is the versatility of VR. You can be an astronaut on Apollo 11, of whom no interaction is expected.  Or you can immerse yourself in games of combat, puzzle solving, ping pong, putt putt golf… without ever leaving  your home.  

This is the promise of VR.  As so many of us are becoming too old to jump out of planes, or ski down mountains, it turns out the mountain is coming to us.  

Even better, there are many games and experiences in virtual reality for sitting down.  Shiresmith will give you our take on these from the viewpoint of an experienced (ahem, very experienced) gamer, and from someone who was never much into games before VR.

 

Time Enough To Play

At Shiresmith, play means creating, animating, coding, AI, writing, games, and of course all things VR.

 

The Main Characters

 

Our resident novelist is also an experienced game player.  When we say experienced, does the phrase ‘enter disk 12 of 20’ mean anything to you?   He’s played more computer games than most people have clicked ‘forgot my password.’  

 

Our resident developer learned to code on computers before they came with hard drives.  She has a Ph.D. in A.I. and Computer Graphics, and has mastered more languages and software packages than Isaac Asimov has novels.  For her, VR has made playing games almost as much fun as making them.